Dr. Linda Britton

  • Dr. Linda Britton is chief medical officer for UnitedHealthcare Medicare & Retirement of Tennessee.

With Mother’s Day part of the annual springtime cycle of renewal, this year’s celebration may bring added significance given Tennessee’s continued reopening amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

As more people get vaccinated and some families start to gather in person again, it may be an ideal time to think about ways to help improve the health of women in Tennessee and honor the important role they play in their families’ well-being. Promoting the health of women should continue to be a priority for our country, especially because some mothers may now be coping with more stress while managing additional work and family responsibilities.

In fact, recent research concludes that COVID-19 has affected maternal health in multiple ways, including reducing access to prenatal visits, increasing the frequency of depression and anxiety, and challenges related to child care. To recognize Mother’s Day and National Women’s Health Week (May 9-15), here are three tips to consider to help support the health of women, including expectant and new mothers:

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention now recommend that pregnant people receive the COVID-19 vaccine, in part because they are at elevated risk for severe illness from this disease.

Consider vaccine options

Some pregnant or lactating women may be concerned about the safety of COVID-19 vaccines currently authorized for emergency use. Importantly, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention now recommend that pregnant people receive the COVID-19 vaccine, in part because they are at elevated risk for severe illness from this disease. Other research indicates that vaccinated mothers may pass along to their babies antibodies against COVID-19 through breast milk, potentially offering protection to infants.

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To help find vaccine locations in your area and address potential concerns, talk with your primary care physician, check local pharmacies or review publicly available websites.